Three (3) 52 kWh Energy Storage Systems – Lithium Batteries: For Sale

We have some available inventory on hand of lithium Ion Batteries that are intended for a solar KW demand or photovoltaic (PV) solar application.

Description of Battery Equipment: 

BMS system with 800 A Fuse, Contactor | Current sensor Contactor connected to Under Voltage [UV] and Over Voltage [OV] Warning and Fault | Audible Buzzer for Warnings. Cell Voltage Display | Multiplexer with CAN BUS J1939 and CAN OPEN with additional digital out for accessory controls with Quantity 3 enclosures connected in parallel.


Nominal Capacity : 52 Kwhr
Three (3) 52 Kwhr Energy Storage Systems – Lithium batteries 48 Volts connected in series. Pack Voltage Nominal 48 VDC; Pack Voltage Peak 60 VDC; Cycle life 3000 Cycles;  Includes Battery Management system, CAN Bus monitoring of temperature and voltage control. Includes programmable master control display.

  • Battery Type : Lithium Iron Phosphate
  • Battery Voltage : 48 Volt DC | 16 cells connected in series
  • Operating Voltage: 42 Vdc to 60 Vdc
  • Cycle Life 3000 Cycles
  • Charge Voltage: 52.5 Vdc Bulk Charge | 56.0 Vdc Absorption Charge | 54 Vdc Float Charge
  • Discharge Voltage: 45 Vdc Max
  • Max Discharge Current : 300 amps at 80% DOD | 750 Amps at 50% DOD
  • Max Charge Current : 500 Amps
  • Operating Temperature -45 deg C to 65 Deg C
  • Warranty 10 Years Prorated
  • Dimensions : 58 X 43 X 44 inches ( L X W X H) [Quantity 3 enclosures connected in parallel].

 

Solar Shade Covered Parking

Need some solar shade parking to keep your employees happy, leverage some tax credits and save money on your utility expense? Yep, we got you covered!

We’ve found that all of our clients here in the desert southwest want covered parking for their cars. If you don’t have it then you’re stepping into a furnace every time you get in your vehicle. Solar Shade covered parking is the way to go. Two birds one stone. Shade and renewable electricity to knock down your utility bill.

 

Lucid Motors to Provide Customers with Access to Electrify America’s Ultra-Fast Charging Network

Lucid Motors has entered into a preliminary agreement with Electrify America to provide Lucid customers a nationwide charging plan. By the end of June of 2019, Electrify America will install or have under construction over 2,000 DC ultra-fast chargers at nearly 500 sites in metro and highway locations across 40 states and 17 major cities.

Lucid selected Electrify America after an extensive evaluation and cited Electrify America’s DC power levels of up to 350kW and network coverage as key selection criteria. Lucid was also attracted by Electrify America’s premium charging experience, providing EV drivers with safe and convenient charging locations that offer amenities like shopping, food, and restrooms.

Lucid’s first vehicle, the Lucid Air sedan, will begin production in 2020. “We are excited to be working with Electrify America given its extensive charging network and aggressive growth plans. The groundbreaking battery technology we developed for the Lucid Air allows class leading EPA range and ultra-fast charging with minimal cell degradation. Combining our technology with Electrify America’s network provides our customers with a comprehensive charging solution for their everyday lives,” said Peter Rawlinson, Chief Technology Officer of Lucid.

Electrify America is investing $2 billion over ten years in zero emission vehicle (ZEV) infrastructure, education, and awareness initiatives to help drive ZEV adoption. “Electrify America is proud to provide Lucid and its customers with our ultra-fast charging,” said Giovanni Palazzo, President and CEO, Electrify America. “Our high-powered, nationwide network of chargers is a great match with the EV technology offered by Lucid and a further opportunity to expand electric vehicle adoption in the U.S.”

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This article was originally published on

Lucid Signs $1bn+ Investment Agreement with Public Investment Fund of Saudi Arabia

Here it is, a major investment into electric transportation by a government that wants a big piece of the new economy’s electric transportation sector. Telsa, who is the undisputed leader in electric automotive transportation may now have some competition. It looks like there will be a two year buffer to get all the production kinks worked out before there is any hint of a car to even roll off the production line for Lucid. Let’s see..this is going to be exciting!!

Lucid Motors announced today that it has executed a $1bn+ (USD) investment agreement with the Public Investment Fund of Saudi Arabia, through a special-purpose vehicle wholly owned by PIF.

Under the terms of the agreement, the parties made binding undertakings to carry out the transaction subject to regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions.

The transaction represents a major milestone for Lucid and will provide the company with the necessary funding to commercially launch its first electric vehicle, the Lucid Air, in 2020. Lucid plans to use the funding to complete engineering development and testing of the Lucid Air, construct its factory in Casa Grande, Arizona, begin the global rollout of its retail strategy starting in North America, and enter production for the Lucid Air.

Lucid’s mission is to inspire the adoption of sustainable energy by creating the most captivating luxury electric vehicles, centered around the human experience. “The convergence of new technologies is reshaping the automobile, but the benefits have yet to be truly realized. This is inhibiting the pace at which sustainable mobility and energy are adopted. At Lucid, we will demonstrate the full potential of the electric connected vehicle in order to push the industry forward,” said Peter Rawlinson, Chief Technology Officer of Lucid.

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Lucid and PIF are strongly aligned around the vision to create a global luxury electric car company based in the heart of Silicon Valley with world-class engineering talent. Lucid will work closely with PIF to ensure a strategic focus on quickly bringing its products to market at a time of rapid change in the automotive industry.

A spokesperson for PIF said, “By investing in the rapidly expanding electric vehicle market, PIF is gaining exposure to long-term growth opportunities, supporting innovation and technological development, and driving revenue and sectoral diversification for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.”

The spokesperson added, “PIF’s international investment strategy aims to strengthen PIF’s performance as an active contributor in the international economy, an investor in the industries of the future and the partner of choice for international investment opportunities. Our investment in Lucid is a strong example of these objectives.”

This press release was originally published on SEP 17 2018 on www.lucidmotors.com

How Much Electricity Does It Take To Grow Marijuana? Colorado Cities Are Finding Out

Colorado’s appetite for lighting up requires a lot of lights, it turns out.Licensed marijuana growers traditionally cultivate their products indoors under very bright lights that suck a lot of electricity. With the release of the federal government’s Clean Power Plan looming, cities across the state are working to reduce their carbon footprint. Part of those efforts include persuading grows to reduce their power consumption.

Between 2012 and 2013, the latest data available, electricity use increased by 1.2 percent across the city and county of Denver. Commercial marijuana grows were responsible for nearly half of that uptick.

“We’re very keen to see what is increasing energy use, and to have half of that coming from the grow industry is definitely something we pay attention to,” said Sonrisa Lucero, a strategist for the Denver’s Office of Sustainability.

Denver marijuana grows used just 1.85 percent of the city’s overall electricity in 2013. But any uptick matters because the city set a voluntary goal to prevent total energy consumed from rising past its 2012 use levels. Lucero’s job is to make sure that energy efficiency is top of mind for new residents and businesses.

The city is working with marijuana grow operations to lower their electricity use. Or the industry may sort itself out: A growing number of outdoor and greenhouse grow operations in Colorado are emerging that could make indoor grows obsolete — or at least, less cost effective.

A $12,000 electricity bill

Colorado Harvest Company’s Flower Room No. 1 holds dozens of green plants thriving underneath 22 1,000-watt lamps.

(Nathaniel Minor/CPR News)

To understand just how much energy it takes to grow marijuana indoors, look no further than Colorado Harvest Company’s Flower Room No. 1.The room has dozens of green plants thriving underneath 22 1,000-watt lamps hanging from the ceiling. Each is the size of a small card table. An air-conditioning system prevents the lights from overheating.

“Running a cannabis company with indoor production means that you’re going to use more than your fair share of electricity,” said Tim Cullen, the company’s owner.

Cullen’s monthly electricity bill for the 10,000-square-foot warehouse runs a cool $12,000. Another marijuana grow reports spending nearly twice that amount. Cullen said he’s tried to reduce electricity use by using LED lights currently on the market, but they haven’t produced the results he needs.

“We just can’t suffer the losses of having a lower energy bill, but then not producing flowers,” he said.

Tim Cullen, the owner of the Colorado Harvest Company, stands in his grow facility in Denver on Wednesday, July 8, 2015.

(Nathaniel Minor/CPR News)

New LED technology under production could change this picture. But Cullen isn’t waiting for that to happen. Instead he’s building a greenhouse in Denver to commercially grow marijuana. From start to finish, the planning and construction is expected to take about six months.

Greenhouses blooming in Pueblo

Denver has about four commercial marijuana grow greenhouses. But Pueblo is leading the charge in the state, with 16 and counting. Some are small, but others cover as many as 50 acres.

Chris Markuson, director of economic development and GIS for Pueblo County, said shifting priorities are changing how and where marijuana is grown.

“At first the assumption was that the grow operations had to be tightly secured and hidden from public view,” he said. “Because the temperament of the community–and the society as a whole–has come around a little bit, the grow operations are not really seen with negative light. At least they’re not in Pueblo.”

It helps that Pueblo has marketed itself as a business-friendly lower-cost location to cultivate marijuana.

With about 30 marijuana grow businesses overall, Markuson said the majority are using “Pueblo sunshine” to grow product.

Energy use in the area is evolving with the industry. According to Black Hills Energy, which provides power to the city of Pueblo and parts of Pueblo County, 10 grow facilities used 2.1 million kWh in 2014. That’s 0.1 percent of the energy that Black Hills delivered to its Pueblo coverage area.

Laying the groundwork

As the marijuana industry evolves, Colorado cities are deciding how–or if–they want to manage the growing energy demands from the industry.

Denver isn’t considering regulations for the marijuana industry, but pushing LED lights to grows. In Boulder, the city and county are setting measures to require businesses offset their electricity use via subscription of renewable energy credits — things like community solar garden memberships.

Xcel is reportedly working with marijuana growers to update lighting so they’re as energy efficient as possible.

The attempts by utilities and cities fit into a larger movement under way right now, said Howard Geller with Boulder-based Southwest Energy Efficiency Project.

“We can have that economic growth without electricity use increasing,” he said. “That’s going to be beneficial economically and that will help us achieve our environmental goals.”

Denver and Boulder’s work with marijuana and other businesses could be a good warm-up lap for what’s to come. The Clean Power Plan rule, expected to be finalized later this summer, will put even more pressure on states to reduce carbon emissions. Some of that reduction will come from changing where our power comes from. But Geller expects another significant portion to come from things like switching out the lightbulbs.

“Energy efficiency is a strategy that can be implemented very quickly in terms of ramping up rebate and financing programs, education efforts,” said Geller. “Whereas building new power plants–or retrofitting old power plants–that kind of initiative will take years to implement.”

This article was originally published on July 10 2015 by BY GRACE HOOD of Colorado Public Radio
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